It's time to revisit the adage proximal stability promotes distal mobility. This should be a prehab prerequisite to any strenuous overhead exercise. Demonstrated here is a dynamic mobility and stability drill for anterior scapulae muscles. What good is all the mobility in the world if...

From a functional whole body standpoint, any form of a loaded carry is always a go-to exercise for me. This is especially true for overhead carries - which are a great way to train proper shoulder muscle recruitment under heavy load. You need good lower...

Maria Sharapova, the former world #1 women’s tennis player has had quite the remarkable career. However, she has had to battle through a host of well documented shoulder injuries that hampered her career early on. Rumor has it that this exercise in particular helped REHAB...

In Episode 61 we introduced optimal mechanics during the full shoulder overhead motion. The glenohumeral joint aka the shoulder is so interesting because it demands chronologic, selective muscle recruitment. The trapezius muscles aka traps, activate at specific times with balanced force couples to help move...

This is the last barbell tip by @barbellrehab, who wants to remind you to avoid an excessive forward head posture during the press. We want to add that it’s just as important to avoid excessive cervical spine extension when performing deadlifts or squats! It’s okay...

Getting your knee straight after an ACL injury and ACLR surgery can be very challenging. One of the common limiting factors is the hamstrings. Soft tissue mobilization via someone else or using a foam roller typically works, however specific exercises can get the hamstrings to...

“Proximal stability promotes distal mobility.” This adage holds true for every body region and the hamstrings are no exception. Neuromuscular control of the lumbopelvic region is absolutely imperative to all lower extremity biomechanics, especially to optimal hamstring function during normal sport activities. Improving performance of...

You’re probably thinking, “What does limited quadriceps flexibility have to do with increasing my risk for a hamstring strain?” Well, you’re not alone, as I was initially a little stumped by this as well. But after consulting with some of the top physical therapy minds...

One of the biggest risk factors for hamstring strains and re-injury rates is a decrease in hamstring flexibility and reduced extensibility of the musculotendon unit due to residual scare tissue. As we described in the past two episodes, the eccentric control of the hamstrings is...

The best evidence supporting decreased hamstring strain re-injury occurrence is the incorporation of eccentric hamstring exercises. Researchers have determined through isokinetic testing (via high-tech research laboratory equipment) that a strength imbalance ratio of - 20% between eccentric hamstring force production and concentric quadriceps force production...

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